2013-04-17

Carcassonne - Rules

Carcassonne - Rules


Carcassonne is © 2000 Hans im Glück / Rio Grande Games.
The River expansion is © 2001 Hans im Glück / Rio Grande Games.
The Carcassonne Expansion is © 2002 Hans im Glück / Rio Grande Games.
These rules appear courtesy of Jay Tummelson and Rio Grande Games.
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TopA tile-laying game for 2-5 players aged 10 and up.
The southern French city of Carcassonne is famous for its unique Roman and Medieval fortifications. The players develop the area around Carcassonne and deploy their followers on the roads, in the cities, in the cloisters, and in the fields. The skills of the players to develop the area and use their thieves, knights, monks and farmers will determine who is victorious.
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TopCONTENTS
72 land tiles (including one starting tile with a dark back), which picture road, city cloister and field segments
40 followers in 5 colours. Each follower can be used as a thief, knight, monk or farmer. One of each player's followers in the player's scoring marker
1 scoring track, used to track players' scores
1 rules booklet
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TopOVERVIEW
The players place tiles turn by turn. As they do so, the roads, cities, fields and cloisters emerge and grow. On these, the players can deploy their followers to earn points. Players score points during the game and at the end. The player with the most points after the final scoring is the winner.
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TopPREPARATION
Place the starting tile face up in the middle of the table. Shuffle the remaining tiles face down and stack them in several face-down stacks so that all players have easy access to them. Place the scoring track near one edge of the table to leave room for the players to place tiles in the middle of the table.
Each player takes the 8 followers in his colour and places one as his scoring marker in the large space at the lower left of the scoring track. Each player places his remaining 7 followers before him on the table as his supply.
The youngest player decides who will be the starting player.
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TopPLAYING THE GAME
Players take turns in clockwise order beginning with the starting player. On a player's turn, he executes the following actions in the order shown:
  1. The player must draw and place a new tile
  2. The player may deploy one of his followers from his supply on the tile he just placed
  3. If, through the placement of the tile, roadscities or cloisters are completed, they are now scored.

TopPlacing tiles
First a player must draw a tile from one of the face-down stacks. He looks at it, shows it to his fellow players (so they can advise him on the 'best' placement of the tile), and places it on the table, using the following rules:
  • The new tile (with red borders in the examples) must be placed with at least one edge abutting one previously placed tile. The new tile may not simply be placed corner to corner with a previous tile
  • The new tile must be placed so that all road, city and field segments on the new tile match road, city or field segments on all abutting tiles (cloisters are always complete within single tiles)
Spacing graphicTile placement - example 1Spacing graphicRoad and field segments match
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Spacing graphicTile placement - example 2Spacing graphicCity segments match
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Spacing graphicTile placement - example 3Spacing graphicOn one edge the city matches and on the other edge the field matches
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Spacing graphicTile placement - example 4Spacing graphicThis is an invalid placement as the road and city edges do not match
In the rare circumstances where a drawn tile has no legal placement (and all players agree), the player discards the tile from the game (into the box) and draws another tile.

TopDeploying followers
After the player places a tile, he may deploy one of his followers, using the following rules:
  • The player may only play one follower on a turn
  • The player must take it from his supply
  • The player may only deploy it on the tile he just placed
  • The player must choose where to deploy the follower on the tile:
Spacing graphicFollower placement - example 1Spacing graphicA thief on a road
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Spacing graphicFollower placement - example 2Spacing graphicA knight in a city
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Spacing graphicFollower placement - example 3Spacing graphicA monk in a cloister
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Spacing graphicFollower placement - example 8Spacing graphicA farmer in a field - in either of the positions shown
The player may not deploy a follower on a road, city or field segment if that segment connects to a segment on another tile (no matter how far away) that already has a follower (from any player) on it.  See the following examples:
Spacing graphicFollower placement - example 5Spacing graphicBlue can only deploy a farmer as there is already a knight in a connected city segment
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Spacing graphicFollower placement - example 6Spacing graphicRed can deploy his follower as a thief, knight or farmer in the small field, but not as a farmer in the large field as there is already a farmer on a connected field segment.
When a player has deployed all his followers, he continues to play tiles each turn. Although a follower may not be recalled, followers are returned to players when roads, cities and cloisters and scored.

TopScoring completed roads, cities and cloisters
Completed road
A road is complete when the road segments at both ends connect to a crossing, a city of a cloister. A road is also complete if it connects to itself in a loop. There may be many segments along the road.
The player who has a thief on a completed road scores one point for each tile in the road (count the number of tiles). The player moves his scoring marker forward on the scoring track a number of spaces equal to the points earned.
Spacing graphicScoring a road - example 1Spacing graphicRed scores 4 points
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Spacing graphicScoring a road - example 2Spacing graphicRed scores 3 points
Completed city
A city is complete when the city is completely surrounded by a city wall and there are no gaps in the wall. There may be many segments in a city.
The player who has a knight in the completed city scores two points for each segment in the city (count the number of tiles). Each shield on a city segment earns the player two bonus points.  Exception: When a completed city has just two segments, the player scores two points (not four).
Spacing graphicScoring a city - example 1Spacing graphicRed scores 8 points
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Spacing graphicScoring a city - example 2Spacing graphicRed only scores 2 points for a 2 segment city
What happens when a completed road or city has more than one follower?
It is possible through clever placement of tiles for there to be more than one thief on a road or more than one knight in a city. When this occurs in a completed road or city, the player with the most thieves (on a road) or the most knights (in a city) scores all the points.
When two or more players tie with the most thieves or knights, they each score the total points for the road or city.
Spacing graphicMultiple followers exampleSpacing graphicRed and blue each score the full 10 points for the city as they tie with 1 knight each in the completed city.
Completed cloister
A cloister is complete when the tile it is on is completely surrounded by tiles. A player with a monk in the cloister scores nine points.
Spacing graphicCompleted cloister exampleSpacing graphicBlue scores 9 points
Returning followers to players
After a road, city or cloister is scored (and only then), the followers involved are returned to the appropriate players. The returned followers may be used by the players as any of the possible followers (thief, knight, monk, farmer) in later turns.
It is possible for a player to deploy a follower, score a road, city or cloister, and have the follower returned in the same turn.
  1. Complete a road or city by placing the new tile
  2. Deploy a thief or a knight
  3. Score the completed road or city
  4. Return the thief or knight
Spacing graphicInstant follower scoring - example 1Spacing graphicRed scores 3 points for the road
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Spacing graphicInstant follower scoring - example 2Spacing graphicRed scores 2 points for the city
The farms
Connected fields are called farms. Farms are not scored during the game. They exist only as places to deploy farmers. Farmers are only scored in the final scoring.
Farmers remain in the field segment where they are deployed for the entire game and are never returned to the players!
Farms are bordered by roads, cities and the edge of the area where the tiles have been played.
Spacing graphicFarmer placement - example 1Spacing graphicAll 3 farmers have their own farms. The roads and cities separate the farms from each other.
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Spacing graphicFarmer placement - example 2Spacing graphicAfter the placement to the new tile, the farms of the 3 farmers are connected. Note: the player who played the new tile may not deploy a farmer because the connected field segments already have farmers.
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TopGAME END
At the end of the player's turn in which the last tile is placed, the game ends. The final scoring then takes place.

TopFinal scoring
First, all incomplete roads, cities and cloisters are scored. For each incomplete road and city, the player who has a thief on the road or a knight in the city scores one point for each road or city segment in the incomplete road or city. Shields earn the city player one point each. For incomplete roads and cities with more than one follower, use the rules for completed roads and cities to determine who gets the points. For each incomplete cloister, a player with a monk in a cloister scores one point for the cloister tile and one point for each tile that surrounds it.
Spacing graphicrules_21.gif (2133 bytes)Spacing graphicRed scores 3 points for the incomplete road.
Blue scores 4 points for the incomplete city.
Yellow scores 4 points for the incomplete cloister: 1 point for the cloister tile and 3 points for the tiles that surround it.
Farmers score points for supplying cities
Farmers score points as shown below:
  • Only completed cities are supplied and are, therefore, used for the scoring farmers.
  • The farmer's farm must border a completed city to supply it. The distance of the farmer from the city is unimportant.
  • For each city a farmer supplies, the player who deployed the farmer scores four points, regardless of the size of the city or the farm.
Spacing graphicScoring farms - example 1Spacing graphicBlue scores 4 points for the complete city. Blue scores no points for the incomplete city on the second tile from the left.
  • A farmer can supply (and score) several cities when they are adjacent to his farm.
Spacing graphicScoring farms - example 2Spacing graphicBlue scores 8 points.
  • Several farms can supply a single city. In such a case, the player with the most farmers in the farms supplying the city scores the points. If two or more players tie with the most farmers, each of those tied for most scores four points.
Spacing graphicScoring farms - example 3Spacing graphicBlue scores 4 points and red scores nothing as blue has the most farmers.
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Spacing graphicScoring farms - example 4Spacing graphicFor the small city, red and blue are tied and each score 4 points.
For the big city, blue scores 4 points. Red has no farms adjacent to the big city.
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TopWINNING
The player with the most points at the end of the game is the winner.
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TopAlternate farmer scoring
The method for scoring farmers shown above is the original method. German editions of the game from October 2001 scored farmers differently. This scoring method was not introduced to the English version of the game for many years, although it is now the standard rule. As it was introduced later, it is still referred to here as alternate farmer scoring. Always be clear before you start a game which of the farmer scoring methods is being used.
Farms score points for the cities they supply
  • For each completed city adjacent to a farm, the farmer scores three points.
  • More than one farmer may be present in a farm. In such a case, the player with the most farmers in the farms scores the points. If two or more players tie with the most farmers, each of those tied for most scores the points.
Most of the farmer scoring examples shown above work the same, except that reduced points are scored. The third example scores differently, however.
Spacing graphicScoring farms - example 3Spacing graphicBlue scores 6 points for two farms and red scores 3 points for one farm. Each farm scores independently of the others.
The following examples demonstrates the scoring when more than one farmer is in a farm.
Spacing graphicScoring farms - example 3Spacing graphicRed scores 3 points for the farm, as he has two farmers compared to blue's single farmer.